On a journey through debauchery; silliness and hypocrisy, Reginald D. Hunter explores themes of human nature and the intrinsic nuances which make up our cultural world.

In, In The Midst of Crackers, Hunter takes a more introspective and confessional approach to respond to the controversies which have surrounded his work and, in particular, his choice of language, by demonstrating the hypocrisies which exist hidden behind euphemism, within society.

Exploring themes of Race; Sex and Relationships through, often, long philosophical ramblings whose only punchline seems to emerge from the need for a release from the awkward tension that has arisen, Hunter poses some difficult questions with a remarkable ability to silence his audience completely, before raising them into a fit of giggle fury.

The more personal material presented through the discussion of relationships and, in particular, Hunters confessions of cheating on former girlfriends, leaves a slightly awkward and unsympathetic taste, despite the intellectual repartee with which the anecdote is staged, and leaves you feeling a little like you’re sat in the pub with a group of Blokes and a sign outside reading “Beer as cold as your ex-girlfriend’s heart”

He has an ability to frame a discussion of some merit in rapturous silliness, drawing the audience in with philosophical smarts which endeavour to highlight and often shame the inequalities, hypocrisies and injustices of life and then ending on a butt joke. An altogether whimsy which just goes to show that life is really silly sometimes and so are the inequalities in it.

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The overall tone of the show is one of confession, as Hunter aims to respond to critique; controversy and personal failings, where he is more often than not painted as the “Bad Guy”.

It is a show that, in its best moments, explores society with philosophical vigour and great intellect leaving the audience in a limbo of perplexing morality and a “whatever” giggle. At times, however, it feels lacking in clarity perhaps, as simply because; life, in itself, is lacking in the very clarity which Hunter aims to examine.