Condom allergy

Some people have an allergy to latex and it might be more common than you think. Around one to three percent of people are apparently allergic to latex – and that number goes up for people who are in constant contact with it – like medical workers and manufacturers of latex products.

So if you’re left with a red or itchy skin – or have hives after wearing a condom or having one up your butt – you could have an allergic reaction. Those symptoms can stretch to a runny nose, difficulty breathing, coughing and wheezing and itchy eyes. In the most serious and rarest of cases, a person could go into an anaphylactic shock. Your partner should seek immediate medical attention if this happens. However, let’s stress this is very unlikely to happen with your first contact with latex.

So there are many options available to you if you have a latex allergy – there are non-latex condoms. There are ranges like Skyn that make ultra thin lubricated condoms. Durex and Pasante also make a range of latex free condoms.

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Not the right position

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Perhaps it the position that is making it uncomfortable for you. If the guy that is topping you is large, girthy or very long you might want to swap positions so that you’re more in control. Try a spooning position. Both of you lie on your sides – facing in the same direction. The receptive partner should bring their legs up towards their chest and the giver nestles in nice and close. The brilliance of this position is that it limits the thrusting motion of the topper giving the receiver a bit of them to get used to the sensations. But it still feels intimate. It is a good one to warm up with!