How has Theresa May's cabinet voted in gay and LGBT+ issues throughout their time as MPs?

How has Theresa May’s cabinet voted in gay and LGBT+ issues throughout their time as MPs?

In order to get our LGBT friendly rating, we have combined absent and abstained votes as a No vote. You can read a comment on this at the bottom of the article.

These findings were taken from the TheyWorkForYou.com website. In determining our rating we have highlighted major votes (as determined by TheyWorkForYou). We have left out “less important votes” which is why some tallies may not match the major votes.

Quick Analysis:

21 Ministers (and one Peer), including the Prime Minister.

Number of ministers who have a 50% or above LGBT friendly rating: 12/21

Number of ministers who have a 49% or under LGBT friendly rating: 9/21

Number of ministers who have a 100% LGBT friendly rating: 5/21

Number of ministers who have under a 20% LGBT friendly rating: 3/21

Prime Minister

Theresa May

8 votes for, 10 votes against, 9 absences, between 2002–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 5

2003: Civil partnerships.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014:  Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 2

1998: Equalising the age of consent.

2002: Allowing gay couples to adopt children.

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 3

2003: Repeal a ban on the promotion of homosexuality in schools. Section 28.

2004: Allow Marriages to Remain Valid If They Become a Same-Sex Marriage.

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

Rating: 29.6%

Analysis of Theresa May’s LGBT voting:

Ms May is what we’d call an evolved Minister on LGBT+ and gay rights. Prior to 2004 she systematically voted against the rights of gay people in the UK. Then we see a 180-degree change in her voting pattern, although she did have a blip in 2007 when she failed to vote on the Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality law. Since the beginning of this decade, she has voted positively for LGBT+ community.


First Secretary Of State, Minister for the Cabinet Office

David Lidington

3 votes for, 18 votes against, 6 absences, between 2003–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 1

2004: Allow Marriages to Remain Valid If They Become a Same-Sex Marriage.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 3

1998: Equalising the age of consent.

2002: Allowing gay couples to adopt children.

2003: Repeal a ban on the promotion of homosexuality in schools. Section 28.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 4

2004: Civil partnerships.

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

2014:  Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

Rating: 11.1%

Analysis of David Lidington’s LGBT voting:

David Lingtonton is one of worst voters on LGBT+ and gay matters in Theresa May’s Cabinet. He has nearly voted against or failed to turn up to every major vote concerning the equality of gay people in the UK since he took office. He has only voted positively on one major piece of legislation which was in 2004.


 

Chancellor of the Exchequer

Philip Hammond

3 votes for, 11 votes against, 13 absences, between 2002–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 2

2014:  Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 2

1998: Equalising the age of consent.

2002: Allowing gay couples to adopt children.

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 6

2003: Repeal a ban on the promotion of homosexuality in schools. Section 28.

2003: Civil partnerships.

2004: Allow Marriages to Remain Valid If They Become a Same-Sex Marriage.

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

Rating: 11.1%

Analysis of Philip Hammond’s LGBT voting:

Philip Hammond has an appalling voting record on LGBT matters and his six failures to appear for a vote, to us, shows a very real lack of respect for gay rights and the LGBT+ community. He hasn’t, it would appear evolved on matters of LGBT rights, even failing to appear for the 2013 same-sex marriage vote.


 

Foreign Secretary

Jeremy Hunt

8 votes for, 2 votes against, between 2008–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 5

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 0

Rating: 80%

Analysis of Jeremy Hunt’s LGBT voting:

Jeremy has a perfect score for voting on gay and LGBT+ matters.


Home Secretary

Sajid Javid

2 votes for, 0 votes against, 5 absences, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 2

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 2

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

Rating: 28.5%

Analysis of Sajid Javid’s LGBT voting:

His absenteeism is cause for concern. Despite voting positively for same-sex marriage he didn’t attend a vote to equalise marriage laws or extend the right to marry to our armed forces.


Brexit Secretary

Stephen Barclay

4 votes for, 0 votes against, 3 absences, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 4

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

2014: Against various amendments to acts of Parliament in light of the introduction of same-sex marriage.

MAJOR NO VOTES:0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 1

Stephen Barclay was absent for a vote on Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill — Second Reading

Rating: 75%

Analysis of Stephen Barclays’s LGBT voting:

Almost perfect score for Mr Barclay’s voting record for LGBT Right. He was absent from the second reading of Marriage (same-sex couples) Bill, but ultimately voted for the rights of gay couples to marry.


 

Secretary of State for Defence

Gavin Williamson

2 votes for, 5 votes against, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 0

MAJOR NO VOTES: 5

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

2014: Against various amendments to acts of Parliament in light of the introduction of same-sex marriage.

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 0

Rating: 28.5%

Analysis of Gavin Williamson’s LGBT voting:

Gavin Williamson is one of worst voters on LGBT+ and gay matters in Theresa May’s Cabinet. He has voted against every major vote concerning the equality of gay people in the UK since he took office in 2010.


 

Health and Social Care Secretary

Matthew Hancock

7 votes for, 0 votes against, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 7

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

Rating: 100%

Analysis of Matthew Hancock’s LGBT voting:

Mr Hancock has a perfect score for voting on gay and LGBT+ matters.

 


 

Justice Secretary

David Gauke

7 votes for, 3 votes against, between 2007–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 4

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 1

2007: Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 0

Rating: 70%

Analysis of David Gauke’s LGBT voting:

David Gauke has a near perfect voting record on LGBT+ issues.


 

Education Secretary

Damian Hinds

7 votes for, 0 votes against, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 7

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

Rating: 100%

Analysis of Matthew Hancock’s LGBT voting:

Mr Hinds has a perfect score for voting on gay and LGBT+ matters.


 

Secretary of State for International Trade

Dr Liam Fox

2 votes for, 14 votes against, 11 absences, between 2003–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 0

MAJOR NO VOTES: 4

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2002: Allowing gay couples to adopt children.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Both readings).

2014:  Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 5

1998: Equalising the age of consent.

2003: Repeal a ban on the promotion of homosexuality in schools. Section 28.

2003: Civil partnerships.

2004: Allow Marriages to Remain Valid If They Become a Same-Sex Marriage.

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

Rating: 7.4%

Analysis of Dr Liam Fox’s LGBT voting:

Liam Fox has an appalling voting record on LGBT+ matters. He has systematically voted against or failed to attend votes pertaining to the LGBT+ community since 1998; doing his LGBT+ constituents in North Somerset a great disservice.


 

Secretary of State for Businesses, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Greg Clark

7 votes for, 1 vote against, 2 absences, between 2007–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 4

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 1

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

Rating: 70%

Analysis of Greg Clark’s LGBT voting:

Greg Clark has an almost perfect voting record for LGBT+ rights in the UK.


 

Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Michael Gove

5 votes for, 0 votes against, 5 absences, between 2008–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 3

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 2

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

Rating: 50%

Analysis of Michael Gove’s LGBT voting:

Although Michael Gove has never voted against LGBT+ equality he has been absent from half the votes that affected the gay community.


Secretary of State for Transport

Chris Grayling

9 votes for, 7 votes against, 4 absences, between 2002–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 5

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 3

2003: Repeal a ban on the promotion of homosexuality in schools. Section 28.

2003: Civil partnerships.

2004: Gender Recognition Bill

Rating: 45%

Analysis of Chris Grayling’s LGBT voting:

Chris Grayling is an almost 50-50 politician on LGBT+ matters. Although he has voted positively on many matters, his absence from some votes is cause for concern.


House and Communities Secretary

James Brokenshire

7 votes for, 3 votes against, between 2007–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 4

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 1

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 0

Rating: 70%

Analysis of James Brokenshire’s LGBT voting:

A good show for James Brokenshire and his voting on gay equality. However, there is one blip on his voting record and that was for 2007’s Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.


Leader of the Lords

Baroness Evans


Secretary of State for Scotland

David Mundell

6 votes for, 3 votes against, 3 absences, between 2000–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 3

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 2

2007: Discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

Rating: 50%

Analysis of David Mundell’s LGBT voting:

We would have hoped that one of the UK’s highest profile out politicians would have a flawless voting record, however, Mundell has been absent from too many votes for our liking.


Secretary of State for Wales

Alun Cairns

2 votes for, 1 vote against, 4 absences, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 0

MAJOR NO VOTES: 1

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 3

2013: Same-sex marriage.

2014:  Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

Rating: 28.5%

Analysis of Alun Cairn’s LGBT voting:

Mr Cairns’ voting record, although not the worst in the Cabinet, certainly fails his LGBT constituents in the Vale of Glamorgan.


Northern Ireland Secretary

Karen Bradley

7 votes for, 0 votes against, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 4

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014:  Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 0

Rating: 100%

Analysis of Karen Bradley’s LGBT voting:

Ms Bradley has a perfect score for voting on gay and LGBT+ matters.


Secretary of State for International Development

Penny Mordaunt

7 votes for, 0 votes against, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 4

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTE: 0

Rating: 100%

Analysis of Penny Mordaunt’s LGBT voting:

Having only served as an MP since 2010, Penny Mordaunt is part of a new Conservative wave – a much more liberal thinker. Compared with some of her longer serving Cabinet members, she has voted in far fewer matters that concern the LGBT+ community however, she has consistently voted for LGBT+ rights and is one of the highest scorers on this league table.


Culture Secretary

Jeremy Wright

2 votes for, 4 votes against, 4 absences, between 2008–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 2

2013: Jeremy Wright voted in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. (in primary readings, but ultimately voted against same-sex marriage)

MAJOR NO VOTES: 4

2013: Jeremy Wright voted in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry.

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 4

2013: Jeremy Wright was absent for a vote on Same-Sex Marriage — Enabling Courts to Deal with Divorce or Annulment Proceedings

2014: Jeremy Wright was absent for a vote on Make Same-Sex Marriage Available to Armed Forces Personnel Outside the United Kingdom

2007: Jeremy Wright was absent for a vote on Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations

Rating: 25%

Analysis of Jeremy Wright’s LGBT voting:

Having served since 2008, Mr Wright has had plenty of opportunities to enhance the rights of LGBT people in the UK, however, he has one of the worse ratings on Ms May’s Cabinet.


Work and Pensions Secretary

Amber Rudd

7 votes for, 0 votes against, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 5

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 0

Rating: 100%

Analysis of Amber Rudd’s LGBT voting:

Having only served as an MP since 2010, Amber Rudd is part of a new Conservative wave – a much more liberal thinker. Compared with some of her longer serving Cabinet members, she has voted in far fewer matters that concern the LGBT+ community however, she has consistently voted for LGBT+ rights and is one of the highest scorers on this league table.


 

Party Chair

Brandon Lewis

4 votes for, 0 votes against, 3 absences, between 2013–2014

MAJOR YES VOTES: 4

2013: Same-sex marriage. (Feb)

2013: Same-sex marriage. (May)

MAJOR NO VOTES: 0

MAJOR ABSENT VOTES: 3

2014: Enabling the courts to deal with proceedings for the divorce of, or annulment of the marriage of, a same-sex couple.

2014: Making same-sex marriage available to armed forces personnel outside the UK.

Rating: 57%

Analysis of Brandon’s LGBT voting:

Generally speaking Brandon has voted for the rights of LGBT+ people however was absent from three crucial votes which directly affect the rights of LGBT armed forces and allowing the courts to treat LGBT people in the matter of divorce.

 


How we calculated our results.
Using TheyWorkForYou.com we were able to define MPs’ voting records on equality issues. We made conclusions on an MP’s voting record – we counted Absent votes as a negative.

ABSENT COMMENT – Editor

For this analysis on how this government’s head ministers LGBT friendly rating, we have chosen to consider an absent or abstain vote as a no vote. In my opinion, if you are absent for a vote you are voting for the status quo – which often meant a poorer equality for the LGBT community, such as votes surrounding age of consent, repealing section 28 and of course same-sex marriage.

In my view, Abstaining is worse than Absent, because I believe that abstaining indicates a level of contempt and that certain issues are not even worth consideration.